Frost Museum of Science

Museum

After years of anticipation, the Phillip and Patricia Frost Museum of Science opened its new doors to all with a passion for the next generation of scientific innovation. Group Delphi partnered with London-based designer, Casson Mann, to build and project manage the 7,000-square-foot Feathers to the Stars exhibit — an experience that immerses visitors in the evolution of flight.

THE SKY IS THE LIMIT Feathered dinosaurs, a full-size F5 fighter jet and gliders suspended from the ceiling, and artifacts from the Smithsonian were installed by Group Delphi to give visitors a high-flying history of flight. Glass cases housing the smaller of the prehistoric creatures, individual exhibits, and interactive elements throughout were all produced by the Group Delphi team. Surrounded by all this science, visitors are invited to put their newly-acquired aeronautical-engineering skill sets to the test at a paper-airplane-making station and nearby wind column.
THE GIFT OF FLIGHT After its grand re-opening, the museum saw nearly 800,000 visitors move through the doors in 2017 alone. Feathers to the Stars remains a crowd favorite to this day, welcoming guests of all ages to interact with elements throughout the space. From a trip back in time to the soaring advancements in aviation today, visitors are treated to one of evolution’s crowning achievements: flight.
5 … 4 … 3 … 2 … 1 To set the scene, every element in the exhibit leans in towards one point in the room. As visitors enter, it appears as though both animals and machines are pointed directly into the wind, ready to experience their first moments in the sky. The illusion is made even more immersive with a 70 foot-wide wall projection utilizing image-blending software to simulate breezy air flow moving over the space.
“Working with Group Delphi was effective, efficient, and a pleasure.”
- Jorge Perez-Gallego, PhD, MFA, Astrophysicist, Former Designer, Feathers to the Stars Project Director

Contact Us

Let's Talk About Your Project

Get Started